Upcoming Teaching Seminars

  • Crafting a Teaching Philosophy Statement Workshop

    Wednesday, September 4, 12:30–2:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    Will you be going on the academic job market soon? Teaching statements are often requested as part of an academic job application packet. Writing a teaching statement can serve both practical and reflective purposes, as you reflect on your approach to teaching and what you do as an instructor to improve student learning in your discipline. In this workshop, we will examine research on how search committees evaluate teaching effectiveness. We will provide you with questions to guide your reflection process as well as strategies for drafting your teaching statement. NOTE: This workshop is the first in a two-part series. In Part 1, you will have an opportunity to generate content in advance of completing a draft. In Part 2, “Refining Your Teaching Philosophy Statement Workshop,” you will have an opportunity to receive feedback on a draft of your teaching philosophy statement. Completing a Teaching Philosophy Statement is a requirement for FFP, however this workshop will not count toward FFP seminar credit.

  • Teaching Inclusively: Navigating Issues of Identity and Authority in the Classroom*

    Monday, September 9, 10:30am–Noon

    Tepper Quad 1308

    Our classrooms are shaped--both overtly and indirectly--by the prior knowledge, life experiences, and personal beliefs of both instructors and students. In this seminar, we will consider the ways in which visible and invisible identities impact relationships 1) among students, and 2) between instructors and students. For instance, in what ways might the instructor’s credibility and authority be connected to their identity? How might students’ identities impact the classroom dynamics? Participants will consider the impact of their teaching practices, behavior, and attitudes on student motivation and performance, and acquire strategies to address identity-related challenges that may arise in the teaching and learning process.

  • Refining Your Teaching Philosophy Statement Workshop

    Wednesday, September 18, 12:30–2:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    Will you be going on the academic job market soon? Do you want to finish the teaching statement project for the Future Faculty Program? In this interactive workshop, participants bring a draft of their teaching philosophy statement (a reflective document often included in academic job applications) and through a series of hands-on activities receive feedback from workshop facilitators and other participants. This workshop will prime participants to revise their statement for the upcoming job market and to complete the FFP teaching statement project. Each participant will be connected with an Eberly consultant who will schedule a one-on-one follow-up to review a second draft. Not sure where to begin? This workshop is the second in a two-part series. In Part 1, “Crafting Your Teaching Philosophy Statement Workshop,” you will have an opportunity to generate content in advance of completing a draft. In Part 2, you will have an opportunity to receive feedback on a draft of your teaching philosophy statement. You may attend Part 2 even if you did not attend Part 1. Completing a Teaching Philosophy Statement is a requirement for FFP, however, this workshop will not count toward FFP seminar credit.

  • Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs)*

    Thursday, September 26, 1:30–3:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) are a set of specific activities that instructors can use to quickly gauge students’ comprehension. They are generally used to assess students’ understanding of material in real-time, providing useful feedback to both you and your students, and can also be used to gauge students’ knowledge coming into a course or program with minor modifications. Come hear about the research supporting CATs, experience different types of CATs and the data you can collect from them, and explore how you can use CATs in your context to achieve your teaching goals.

  • Engaging Students in Active Learning*

    Friday, October 11, 11:30am–1:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    Did you learn to ride a bike, multiply, or read simply by listening to someone explain how to do those things? Probably not. Active (rather than passive) learning helps students better understand and retain knowledge. Participants will discuss research findings regarding the benefits of active learning in different disciplines and teaching contexts. You will experience and learn about a variety of active learning strategies and begin developing your own active learning activity to use in your classroom.

  • Microteaching Workshop

    Tuesday, October 15, 4:30–7:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1301 & 1309

    In this interactive workshop, participants teach a 5-minute lesson and receive feedback on their teaching from the other participants and the workshop leaders. These lessons are videotaped. Note: This workshop can count toward the Future Faculty Program's teaching feedback consultation requirement, but not the seminar requirement. Attending the workshop and following up to watch and discuss the video of your lesson with an Eberly colleague can substitute for ONE of the two teaching feedback consultations required for the Future Faculty Program.

  • Designing Effective Assessments: Multiple-Choice Questions*

    Tuesday, October 22, 1:30–3:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    How do I create a multiple choice exam (or question) that effectively measures student learning? What are strategies for writing multiple choice questions to assess critical thinking? How can I easily generate banks of questions? In this hands-on seminar, participants will explore these questions and more as they practice applying best practices to critique, revise, and grade sample multiple choice questions.

  • Microteaching Workshop

    Wednesday, October 30, 4:30–7:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1301 & 1309

    In this interactive workshop, participants teach a 5-minute lesson and receive feedback on their teaching from the other participants and the workshop leaders. These lessons are videotaped. Note: This workshop can count toward the Future Faculty Program's teaching feedback consultation requirement, but not the seminar requirement. Attending the workshop and following up to watch and discuss the video of your lesson with an Eberly colleague can substitute for ONE of the two teaching feedback consultations required for the Future Faculty Program.

  • Guiding Attention and Memory to Build Knowledge*

    Monday, November 4, 2:30–4:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    How do students organize, store, and recall knowledge? Come learn about the research on attention and memory, its implications for teaching declarative knowledge, and strategies you can use to help students study more effectively, and build (and maintain) knowledge. (Note: This seminar was formerly named Overview of Student Cognition.)