Upcoming Teaching Seminars

  • GSIO: Teaching Inclusively: Creating a Welcoming and Supportive Climate from Day One*

    Friday, January 11, 9:00–10:30am

    Tepper Quad Simmons A Auditorium

    Whether you have taught before or this is your first time teaching, this session will help you help you create an inclusive classroom climate from the start of your course. You will explore strategies for: (1) getting to know your students; (2) calibrating your instruction to CMU students; (3) creating a classroom climate that welcomes and supports learning for all students; (4) setting appropriate expectations; and (5) motivating and engaging students with course content from day one.

  • GSIO: Grading and Delivering Feedback on Writing Assignments (Papers, Lab Reports, etc.)*

    Friday, January 11, 10:45am–12:15pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    How can you grade efficiently, effectively, and fairly? How can you simultaneously give your students feedback that will maximize their learning? These session will focus on evidence-based strategies for grading and providing feedback on qualitative work, such as writing assignments or short-answer exam questions. Participants will discuss the relationship between grading and feedback, strategies for grading efficiently and fairly, the characteristics of effective feedback, and research on the impacts of different types of feedback on student learning. Through hands-on exercises, participants will practice analyzing and improving examples of feedback on student work. Participants will also practice grading and providing feedback using rubrics. NOTE: The material in this session is very similar to the graduate seminar "Providing Helpful Feedback". If you have already attended that session, then we don't recommend attending this orientation session.

  • GSIO: Grading and Delivering Feedback on Quantitative Assignments*

    Friday, January 11, 10:45am–12:15pm

    Tepper Quad Simmons A Auditorium

    How can you grade efficiently, effectively, and fairly? How can you simultaneously give your students feedback that will maximize their learning? These session will focus on evidence-based strategies for grading and providing feedback on quantitative work, such as problem sets. Participants will discuss the relationship between grading and feedback, strategies for grading efficiently and fairly, the characteristics of effective feedback, and research on the impacts of different types of feedback on student learning. Through hands-on exercises, participants will practice analyzing and improving examples of feedback on student work. Participants will also practice grading and providing feedback using rubrics. NOTE: The material in this session is very similar to the graduate seminar "Providing Helpful Feedback". If you have already attended that session, then we don't recommend attending this orientation session.

  • GSIO: Conducting Productive and Engaging Discussions*

    Friday, January 11, 1:30–3:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    How can you design effective discussion activities for your students? What facilitation strategies maximize student participation, engagement, and learning outcomes? Participants will learn about the factors that influence student learning and engagement during discussions and acquire a toolkit of active learning methods for structuring productive discussions. Through hands-on activities, participants will practice strategies for both designing and facilitating effective discussion activities, such as designing discussion questions, selecting discussion activities aligned with learning objectives, and identifying facilitation strategies to address common concerns about student participation and teaching inclusively. NOTE: The material in this session is very similar to the graduate seminar "Facilitating Productive and Engaging Discussions". If you have already attended that session, then we don't recommend attending this orientation session.

  • GSIO: Working Well One-on-One*

    Friday, January 11, 1:30–3:00pm

    Tepper Quad Simmons A Auditorium

    This session will focus on strategies for working effectively with students one-on-one in a variety of teaching contexts. What strategies can you employ to best support and advance student learning when interacting with students individually during studio, lab, recitation, and/or office hours sessions? How can you handle the difficult interactions that may arise during office hours or other one-on- one interactions? We will discuss effective approaches and campus resources to support you and your students. Then you will have an opportunity to practice putting these strategies to use.

  • Designing, Managing & Assessing Team Work

    Wednesday, January 23, 3:30–5:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    Many courses incorporate team work, and research suggests that collaborative learning can lead to greater outcomes than individual learning. However, such gains depend on how team work is implemented. In this experiential session, participants will learn about and apply a toolkit of strategies for designing, teaching and managing team work successfully. Note: by "team work" we mean both short-term, in-class groups AND long-term, formalized teams for projects.

  • Microteaching Workshop

    Thursday, January 31, 4:30–7:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1301 & 1309

    In this interactive workshop, participants teach a 5-minute lesson and receive feedback on their teaching from the other participants and the workshop leaders. These lessons are videotaped. Note: This workshop can count toward the Future Faculty Program's teaching feedback consultation requirement, but not the seminar requirement. Attending the workshop and following up to watch and discuss the video of your lesson with an Eberly colleague can substitute for ONE of the two teaching feedback consultations required for the Future Faculty Program.

  • Helping Students Develop Mastery & Critical Thinking*

    Friday, February 15, 1:30–3:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    Instructors often want students to develop mastery with certain content and skills and then apply their learning to “think critically.” Teaching critical thinking as well as helping students develop towards mastery can be difficult, especially in the context of a single course or semester. In this seminar, we will explore a number of evidence-based strategies to help students develop mastery through their acquisition, practice, and integration of appropriate skills, focusing particularly on the skill of “critical thinking." Participants will have the opportunity to apply these strategies to their own discipline and course.

  • Teaching Inclusively: Fostering a Positive Climate for Learning*

    Monday, March 4, 2:30–4:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    Students and instructors come from a variety of backgrounds--including, but not limited to, different cultures, races, and religions; varying levels of ability; and different levels of preparedness. Recognizing these factors is the first step in teaching inclusively, which can significantly impact student motivation and engagement. For instance, student behavior and performance can be impacted by beliefs about stereotypes and belonging, or fear of failure. Furthermore, students can be struggling with physical and intellectual disabilities that may or may not be visible to instructors. In this seminar, we will consider ways to mitigate stereotype threat in the classroom, as well as make courses accessible to all learners. By acknowledging and attending to the specific challenges that some students face, instructors can actually provide the groundwork for supporting all learners.

  • Microteaching Workshop

    Wednesday, March 6, 4:30–7:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1301 & 1308

    In this interactive workshop, participants teach a 5-minute lesson and receive feedback on their teaching from the other participants and the workshop leaders. These lessons are videotaped. Note: This workshop can count toward the Future Faculty Program's teaching feedback consultation requirement, but not the seminar requirement. Attending the workshop and following up to watch and discuss the video of your lesson with an Eberly colleague can substitute for ONE of the two teaching feedback consultations required for the Future Faculty Program.

  • Designing Effective Assessments: Projects and Short- and Long-Answer Exam Questions*

    Tuesday, March 19, 3:00–4:30pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    What are strategies for writing and assessing open-ended exam questions to assess critical thinking? How do I create and assess project to effectively measure student learning? Seminar participants will explore these questions and more as they survey different types of exam assessments, design questions that link to course learning objectives, and generate a rubric to evaluate their assessment.

  • Planning & Delivering Effective Lectures*

    Thursday, March 28, 3:00–4:30pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    When is lecture an appropriate instructional method? What should you consider when developing your lecture? How can you ensure that students are engaged during a lecture and are understanding the material? Come learn about strategies for designing and delivering lectures in ways that support student learning.

  • Course & Syllabus Design*

    Tuesday, April 2, 1:30–3:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    Many decisions affecting the success of a course take place before the first day of class. In the seminar we will identify the principles of effective course design and consider ways to use the syllabus to guide student learning. You will have the opportunity to generate learning objectives and discuss the different components of a course syllabus. We will explore how syllabus design can influence students' perception of the course and the instructor, as well as recognize the benefits and challenges associated with course policies (like mobile devices and participation/attendance).