Upcoming Teaching Seminars

  • Designing Effective Group Work

    Wednesday, September 28, 5:00–6:30pm

    Connan Room, Cohon University Center

    Many courses incorporate group work, and research suggests that collaborative learning can lead to greater outcomes than individual learning. However, such gains depend on how group work is implemented. In this experiential session, participants will learn about and apply a toolkit of strategies for designing, teaching and managing group work successfully.

  • Microteaching Workshop

    Thursday, September 29, 4:30–7:00pm

    Cyert Hall A-70

    In this interactive workshop, participants teach a 5-minute lesson and receive feedback on their teaching from the other participants and the workshop leaders. These lessons are videotaped. (Note: This workshop can count toward the Future Faculty Program's teaching feedback consultation requirement, but not the seminar requirement. Attending the workshop and following up to watch and discuss the video of your lesson with an Eberly colleague can substitute for one of the two teaching feedback consultations required for the Future Faculty Program).

  • Microteaching Workshop

    Tuesday, October 11, 4:30–7:00pm

    Cyert Hall A-70

    In this interactive workshop, participants teach a 5-minute lesson and receive feedback on their teaching from the other participants and the workshop leaders. These lessons are videotaped. (Note: This workshop can count toward the Future Faculty Program's teaching feedback consultation requirement, but not the seminar requirement. Attending the workshop and following up to watch and discuss the video of your lesson with an Eberly colleague can substitute for one of the two teaching feedback consultations required for the Future Faculty Program).

  • Leveraging Diversity and Promoting Equity in Your Classroom*

    Wednesday, October 12, 5:00–6:30pm

    McKenna Peter Wright Rooms, Cohon University Center

    Most of us are aware that our students bring a broad variety of experiences, abilities, and backgrounds to the classroom. In this seminar, we will explore how student differences impact teaching and learning, and we will consider how teaching to such differences can be approached as an asset rather than a challenge. You will gain techniques for equitable teaching and strategies for leveraging diversity to improve learning.

  • Handling Problematic Student Behavior

    Monday, October 17, 5:00–6:30pm

    Connan Room, Cohon University Center

    What do you do when a student’s behavior threatens to disrupt the classroom environment or interfere with learning? In this seminar, we will identify some of the causes of problematic student behaviors and the impact those behaviors have on the classroom. We will also discuss research-based strategies for preventing problematic student behavior as well as effective methods for appropriate intervention when it does occur.

  • Providing Helpful Feedback*

    Thursday, October 27, 12:30–2:00pm

    McKenna Peter Wright Rooms, Cohon University Center

    How can you give your students feedback that will maximize their learning? After discussing the main characteristics of effective feedback and exploring the relationship between feedback and grading, we will analyze examples of feedback on student work. We will also discuss strategies for providing feedback efficiently, including the use of rubrics and educational technology tools.

  • How much is too much? Providing undergraduates with the right level of challenge

    Tuesday, November 1, Noon–1:15pm

    Rangos 3, Cohon University Center

    How do we maintain our commitment to educational rigor while promoting a culture that values both academic success and holistic well-being? This session will provide a forum for discussing the current and future undergraduate experience at CMU, with a particular emphasis on students’ emotional, mental, and academic success. These roundtable discussions will invite perspectives from faculty and graduate students regarding undergraduate students’ beliefs and behaviors related to stress, possible sources of student struggle, and realistic strategies we can use to appropriately challenge and support our undergraduate students.

  • Engaging Students in Active Learning*

    Thursday, November 3, Noon–1:30pm

    Cyert Hall B6

    Did you learn to ride a bike, multiply, or read simply by listening to someone explain how to do those things? Probably not. Active (rather than passive) learning helps students better understand and retain knowledge. Participants will discuss research findings regarding the benefits of active learning in different disciplines and teaching contexts. You will experience and learn about a variety of active learning strategies and begin developing your own active learning activity to use in your classroom.