Upcoming Teaching Seminars

  • Designing, Managing & Assessing Team Work

    Wednesday, January 23, 3:30–5:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    Many courses incorporate team work, and research suggests that collaborative learning can lead to greater outcomes than individual learning. However, such gains depend on how team work is implemented. In this experiential session, participants will learn about and apply a toolkit of strategies for designing, teaching and managing team work successfully. Note: by "team work" we mean both short-term, in-class groups AND long-term, formalized teams for projects.

  • Microteaching Workshop

    Thursday, January 31, 4:30–7:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1301 & 1309

    In this interactive workshop, participants teach a 5-minute lesson and receive feedback on their teaching from the other participants and the workshop leaders. These lessons are videotaped. Note: This workshop can count toward the Future Faculty Program's teaching feedback consultation requirement, but not the seminar requirement. Attending the workshop and following up to watch and discuss the video of your lesson with an Eberly colleague can substitute for ONE of the two teaching feedback consultations required for the Future Faculty Program.

  • Helping Students Develop Mastery & Critical Thinking*

    Friday, February 15, 1:30–3:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    Instructors often want students to develop mastery with certain content and skills and then apply their learning to “think critically.” Teaching critical thinking as well as helping students develop towards mastery can be difficult, especially in the context of a single course or semester. In this seminar, we will explore a number of evidence-based strategies to help students develop mastery through their acquisition, practice, and integration of appropriate skills, focusing particularly on the skill of “critical thinking." Participants will have the opportunity to apply these strategies to their own discipline and course.

  • Teaching in Tumultuous Times

    Wednesday, February 20, 2:30–4:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    Instruction can be difficult for both teachers and students following a major incident or tragedy. These events may take an emotional and cognitive toll on students, disrupt their lives, and interfere with learning for extended periods of time. Students’ proximity to such an event does not always determine their response. For example, students may be seriously affected by events that involve total strangers. Additionally, students’ surface responses may not be indicative of the actual effect. As an instructor, it’s important to consider the impacts such events have on students as human beings and learners. In this seminar, we will discuss considerations for determining whether or not to address an event in the classroom, explore practices for creating a classroom community that encourages student engagement with high-stakes topics, and develop multiple strategies for addressing distressing events in your classes in ways that are relevant to learning in your discipline.

  • Teaching Inclusively: Fostering a Positive Climate for Learning*

    Monday, March 4, 2:30–4:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    Students and instructors come from a variety of backgrounds--including, but not limited to, different cultures, races, and religions; varying levels of ability; and different levels of preparedness. Recognizing these factors is the first step in teaching inclusively, which can significantly impact student motivation and engagement. For instance, student behavior and performance can be impacted by beliefs about stereotypes and belonging, or fear of failure. Furthermore, students can be struggling with physical and intellectual disabilities that may or may not be visible to instructors. In this seminar, we will consider ways to mitigate stereotype threat in the classroom, as well as make courses accessible to all learners. By acknowledging and attending to the specific challenges that some students face, instructors can actually provide the groundwork for supporting all learners.

  • Microteaching Workshop

    Wednesday, March 6, 4:30–7:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1301 & 1308

    In this interactive workshop, participants teach a 5-minute lesson and receive feedback on their teaching from the other participants and the workshop leaders. These lessons are videotaped. Note: This workshop can count toward the Future Faculty Program's teaching feedback consultation requirement, but not the seminar requirement. Attending the workshop and following up to watch and discuss the video of your lesson with an Eberly colleague can substitute for ONE of the two teaching feedback consultations required for the Future Faculty Program.

  • Designing Effective Assessments: Projects and Short- and Long-Answer Exam Questions*

    Tuesday, March 19, 3:00–4:30pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    What are strategies for writing and assessing open-ended exam questions to assess critical thinking? How do I create and assess project to effectively measure student learning? Seminar participants will explore these questions and more as they survey different types of exam assessments, design questions that link to course learning objectives, and generate a rubric to evaluate their assessment.

  • Planning & Delivering Effective Lectures*

    Thursday, March 28, 3:00–4:30pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    When is lecture an appropriate instructional method? What should you consider when developing your lecture? How can you ensure that students are engaged during a lecture and are understanding the material? Come learn about strategies for designing and delivering lectures in ways that support student learning.

  • Course & Syllabus Design*

    Tuesday, April 2, 1:30–3:00pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    Many decisions affecting the success of a course take place before the first day of class. In the seminar we will identify the principles of effective course design and consider ways to use the syllabus to guide student learning. You will have the opportunity to generate learning objectives and discuss the different components of a course syllabus. We will explore how syllabus design can influence students' perception of the course and the instructor, as well as recognize the benefits and challenges associated with course policies (like mobile devices and participation/attendance).

  • Teaching in Tumultuous Times

    Tuesday, April 9, 3:00–4:30pm

    Tepper Quad 1308

    Instruction can be difficult for both teachers and students following a major incident or tragedy. These events may take an emotional and cognitive toll on students, disrupt their lives, and interfere with learning for extended periods of time. Students’ proximity to such an event does not always determine their response. For example, students may be seriously affected by events that involve total strangers. Additionally, students’ surface responses may not be indicative of the actual effect. As an instructor, it’s important to consider the impacts such events have on students as human beings and learners. In this seminar, we will discuss considerations for determining whether or not to address an event in the classroom, explore practices for creating a classroom community that encourages student engagement with high-stakes topics, and develop multiple strategies for addressing distressing events in your classes in ways that are relevant to learning in your discipline.